Planet Debian

Subscribe to Planet Debian feed
Planet Debian - https://planet.debian.org/
Updated: 1 hour 4 min ago

Enrico Zini: Mime type associations

6 hours 38 min ago

The last step of my laptop migration was to fix mime type associations, that seem to associate opening file depending on whatever application was installed last, phases of the moon, and what option is the most annoying.

The state of my system after a fresh install, is that, for application/pdf, xdg-open (used for example by pcmanfm) runs inkscape, and run-mailcap (used for example by neomutt) runs the calibre ebook viewer.

It looks like there are at least two systems to understand, debug and fix, instead of one.

xdg-open

This comes from package xdg-utils, and works using .desktop files:

# This runs inkscape
$ xdg-open file.pdf

There is a tool called xdg-mime that queries what .desktop file is associated with a given mime type:

$ xdg-mime query default application/pdf
inkscape.desktop

You can use xdg-mime default to change an association, and it works nicely:

$ xdg-mime default org.gnome.Evince.desktop application/pdf
$ xdg-mime query default application/pdf
org.gnome.Evince.desktop

However, if you accidentally mistype the name of the .desktop file, it won't complain and it will silently reset the association to the arbitrary default:

$ xdg-mime default org.gnome.Evince.desktop application/pdf
$ xdg-mime query default application/pdf
org.gnome.Evince.desktop
$ xdg-mime default evince.desktop application/pdf
$ echo $?
0
$ xdg-mime query default application/pdf
inkscape.desktop

You can use a GUI like xfce4-mime-settings from the xfce4-settings package to perform the same kind of changes avoiding typing mistakes.

The associations seem to be saved in ~/.config/mimeapps.list

run-mailcap

This comes from the package mime-support

You can test things by running it using --norun:

$ run-mailcap --norun file.pdf
ebook-viewer file.pdf

run-mailcap uses the ~/.mailcap and /etc/mailcap to map mime types to commands. This is what's in the system default:

$ grep application/pdf /etc/mailcap
application/pdf; ebook-viewer %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"
application/pdf; calibre %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"
application/pdf; gimp-2.10 %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"
application/pdf; evince %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"

To fix this, I copypasted the evince line into ~/.mailcap, and indeed it gets used:

$ run-mailcap --norun file.pdf
evince file.pdf

There is a /etc/mailcap.order file providing a limited way to order entries in /etc/mailcap, but it can only be manipulated system-wide, and cannot be used for user preferences.

Sadly, this means that if a package changes its mailcap invocation because of, say, a security issue in the former one, the local override will never get fixed.

I am really not comfortable about that. As a workaround, I put this in my ~/.mailcap:

application/pdf; xdg-open %s && sleep 0.3s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"

The sleep 0.3s is needed because xdg-open exits right after starting the program, and when invoked by mutt it means that mutt could delete the attachment before evince has a chance to open it. I had to use the same workaround for sensible-browser, since the same happens when a browser opens a document in an existing tab.

I wonder if there is any reason run-mailcap could not be implemented as a wrapper to xdg-open.

Enrico Zini: Laptop migration

7 hours 24 min ago

My laptop battery started to explode in slow motion. HP requires 10 business days to repair my laptop under warranty, and I cannot afford that length of downtime.

Alternatively, HP quoted me 375€ + VAT for on-site repairs, which I tought was very funny.

For 376.55€ + VAT, which is pretty much exactly the same amount, I bought instead a refurbished ThinkPad X240 with a dual-core I5, 8G of RAM, 250G SSD, and a 1920x1080 IPS display, to use as a spare while my laptop is being repaired. I'd like to thank HP for giving me the opportunity to own a ThinkPad.

Since I'm migrating all my system to the spare and then (hopefully) back, I'm documenting what I need to be fully productive on new hardware.

Install Debian

A basic Debian netinst with no tasks selected is good enough to get going.

Note that if wifi worked in Debian Installer, it doesn't mean that it will work in the minimal system it installed. See here for instructions on quickly bringing up wifi on a newly installed minimal system.

Copy /home

A simple tar of /home is all I needed to copy my data over.

A neat way to do it was connecting the two laptops with an ethernet cable, and using netcat:

# On the source
tar -C / -zcf - home | nc -l -p 12345 -N
# On the target
nc 10.0.0.1 12345 | tar -C / -zxf -

Since the data travel unencrypted in this way, don't do it over wifi.

Install packages

I maintain a few simple local metapackages that depend on the packages I usually used.

I could just install those and let apt bring in their dependencies.

For the build dependencies of the programs I develop, I use mk-build-deps from the devscripts package to create metapackages that make sure they are installed.

Here's an extract from debian/control of the metapackage:

Source: enrico
Section: admin
Priority: optional
Maintainer: Enrico Zini <enrico@debian.org>
Build-Depends: debhelper (>= 11)
Standards-Version: 3.7.2.1

Package: enrico
Section: admin
Architecture: all
Depends:
  mc, mmv, moreutils, powertop, syncmaildir, notmuch,
  ncdu, vcsh, ddate, jq, git-annex, eatmydata,
  vdirsyncer, khal, etckeeper, moc, pwgen
Description: Enrico's working environment

Package: enrico-devel
Section: devel
Architecture: all
Depends:
  git, python3-git, git-svn, gitk, ansible, fabric,
  valgrind, kcachegrind, zeal, meld, d-feet, flake8, mypy, ipython3,
  strace, ltrace
Description: Enrico's development environment

Package: enrico-gui
Section: x11
Architecture: all
Depends:
  xclip, gnome-terminal, qalculate-gtk, liferea, gajim,
  mumble, sm, syncthing, virt-manager
Recommends: k3b
Description: Enrico's GUI environment

Package: enrico-sanity
Section: admin
Architecture: all
Conflicts: libapache2-mod-php, libapache2-mod-php5, php5, php5-cgi, php5-fpm, libapache2-mod-php7.0, php7.0, libphp7.0-embed, libphp-embed, libphp5-embed
Description: Enrico's sanity
 Metapackage with a list of packages that I do not want anywhere near my
 system.
System-wide customizations

I tend to avoid changing system-wide configuration as much as possible, so copying over /home and installing packages takes care of 99% of my needs.

There are a few system-wide tweaks I cannot do without:

  • setup postfix to send mail using my mail server
  • copy Network Manager system connections files in /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/
  • update-alternatives --config editor

For postfix, I have a little ansible playbook that takes care of it.

Network Manager system connections need to be copied manually: a plain copy and a systemctl restart network-manager are enough. Note that Network Manager will ignore the files unless their owner and permissions are what it expects.

Fine tuning

Comparing the output of dpkg --get-selections between the old and the new system might highlight packages manually installed in a hurry and not added to the metapackages.

Finally, what remains is fixing the sad state of mimetype associations, which seem to associate opening file depending on whatever application was installed last, phases of the moon, and what option is the most annoying.

Currently on my system, PDFs are opened in inkscape by xdg-open and in calibre by run-mailcap. Let's see how long it takes to figure this one out.

Noah Meyerhans: Setting environment variables for gnome-session

8 July, 2020 - 06:51

Am I missing something obvious? When did this get so hard?

In the old days, you configured your desktop session on a Linux system by editing the .xsession file in your home directory. The display manager (login screen) would invoke the system-wide xsession script, which would either defer to your personal .xsession script or set up a standard desktop environment. You could put whatever you want in the .xsession script, and it would be executed. If you wanted a specific window manager, you’d run it from .xsession. Start emacs or a browser or an xterm or two? .xsession. It was pretty easy, and super flexible.

For the past 25 years or so, I’ve used X with an environment started via .xsession. Early on it was fvwm with some programs, then I replaced fvwm with Window Maker (before that was even its name!), then switched to KDE. More recently (OK, like 10 years ago) I gradually replaced KDE with awesome and various custom widgets. Pretty much everything was based on a .xsession script, and that was fine. One particularly nice thing about it was that I could keep .xsession and any related helper programs in a git repository and manage changes over time.

More recently I decided to give Wayland and GNOME an honest look. This has mostly been fine, but everything I’ve been doing in .xsession is suddenly useless. OK, fine, progress is good. I’ll just use whatever new mechanisms exist. How hard can it be?

OK, so here we go. I am running GNOME. This isn’t so bad. Alt+F2 brings up the “Run Command” dialog. It’s a different keystroke than what I’m used to, but I can adapt. (Obviously I can reconfigure the key binding, and maybe someday I will, but that’s not the point here.) I have some executables in ~/bin. Oops, the run command dialog can’t find them. No problem, I just need to update the PATH variable that it sees. Hmmm… So how does one do that, anyway? GNOME has a help system, but searching that doesn’t doesn’t reveal anything. But that’s fine, maybe it’s inherited from the parent process. But there’s no xsession script equivalent, since this isn’t X anymore at all. The familiar stuff in /etc/X11/Xsession is no longer used. What’s the equivalent in Wayland? Turns out, there isn’t a shell script at all anymore, at least not in how Wayland and GNOME interact in Debian’s configuration, which seems fairly similar to how anybody else would set this up. The GNOME session runs from a systemd-managed user session.

Digging in to some web search results suggests that systemd provides a mechanism for setting some environment variables for services started by the user instance of the system. OK, so let’s create some files in ~/.config/environment.d and we should be good. Except no, this isn’t working. I can set some variables, but something is overriding PATH. I can create this file:

$ cat ~/.config/environment.d/01_path.conf
USER_INITIAL_PATH=${PATH}
PATH=${HOME}/bin:${HOME}/go/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin
USER_CUSTOM_PATH=${PATH}

After logging in, the “Run a command” dialog still doesn’t see my PATH. So I use Alt+F2 and sh -c "env > /tmp/env" to capture the environment, and this is what I see:

USER_INITIAL_PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/games
USER_CUSTOM_PATH=/home/noahm/bin:/home/noahm/go/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin

So, my environment.d file is there, and it’s getting looked at, but something else is clobbering my PATH later in the startup process. But what? Where? Why? The systemd docs don’t indicate that there’s anything special about PATH, and nothing in /lib/systemd/user-environment-generators/ seems to treat it specially. The string “PATH” doesn’t appear in /lib/systemd/user/ either. Looking for the specific value that’s getting assigned to PATH in /etc shows the only occurrence of it being in /etc/zsh/zshenv, so maybe that’s where it’s coming from? But that should only get set there if it’s otherwise unset or otherwise very minimally set. So I still have no idea where it’s coming from.

OK, so ignoring where my custom value is getting overridden, maybe what’s configured in /lib/systemd/user will point me in the right direction. systemd --user status suggests that the interesting part of my session is coming from gnome-shell-wayland.service. Can we use a standard systemd drop-in as documented in systemd.unit(5)? It turns out that we can. This file sets things up the way I want:

$ cat .config/systemd/user/gnome-shell-wayland.service.d/path.conf
[Service]
Environment=PATH=%h/bin:%h/go/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin

Is that right? It really doesn’t feel ideal to me. Systemd’s Environment directive can’t reference existing environment variables, and I can’t use conditionals to do things like add a directory to the PATH only if it exists, so it’s still a functional regression from what we had before. But at least it’s a text file, edited by hand, trackable in git, so that’s not too bad.

There are some people out there who hate systemd, and will cite this as an illustration of why. However, I’m not one of those people, and I very much like systemd as an init system. I’d be happy to throw away sysvinit scripts forever, but I’m not quite so happy with the state of .xsession’s replacements. Despite the similarities, I don’t think .xsession is entirely the same as SysV-style init scripts. The services running on a system are vastly more important than my personal .xsession, and systemd is far better at managing them than the pile of shell scripts used to set things up under sysvinit. Further, systemd the init system maintains compatibility with init scripts, so if you really want to keep using them, you can. As far as I can tell, though, systemd the user session manager does not seem to maintain compatibility with .xsession scripts, and that’s unfortunate.

I still haven’t figured out what was overriding the ~/.config/environment.d/ setting. Any ideas?

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.1.0: Now on Windows, With Parsers and Faster Still!

8 July, 2020 - 05:45

A smashing new RcppSimdJson release 0.1.0 containing several small updates to upstream simdjson (now at 0.4.6) in part triggered by very excisting work by Brendan who added actual parser from file and string—and together with Daniel upstream worked really hard to make Windows builds as well as complete upstream tests on our beloved (ahem) MinGW platform possible. So this version will, once the builders have caught up, give everybody on Windows a binary—with a JSON parser running circles around the (arguably more feature-rich and possibly easier-to-use) alternatives. Dave just tweeted a benchmark snippet by Brendan, the full set is at the bottom our issue ticket for this release.

RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators, which in its upstream release 0.4.0 improved once more (also see the following point releases). Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed; see the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk).

As mentioned, this release expands the reach of the package to Windows, and adds new user-facing functions. A big thanks for most of this is owed to Brendan, so buy him a drink if you run across him. The full NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.1.0 (2020-07-07)
  • Upgraded to simdjson 0.4.1 which adds upstream Windows support (Dirk in #27 closing #26 and #14, plus extensive work by Brendan helping upstream with mingw tests).

  • Upgraded to simdjson 0.4.6 with further upstream improvements (Dirk in #30).

  • Change Travis CI to build matrix over g++ 7, 8, 9, and 10 (Dirk in #31; and also Brendan in #32).

  • New JSON functions fparse and fload (Brendan in #32) closing #18 and #10).

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release.

For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: AsioHeaders 1.16.1-1 on CRAN

8 July, 2020 - 05:28

An updated version of the AsioHeaders package arrived on CRAN today (after a we days of “rest” in the incoming directory of CRAN). Asio provides a cross-platform C++ library for network and low-level I/O programming. It is also included in Boost – but requires linking when used as part of Boost. This standalone version of Asio is a header-only C++ library which can be used without linking (just like our BH package with parts of Boost).

This release brings a new upstream version. Its changes required a corresponding change in one of (only) three reverse depends which delayed the CRAN admisstion by a few days.

Changes in version 1.16.1-1 (2020-06-28)
  • Upgraded to Asio 1.16.1 (Dirk in #5).

  • Updated README.md with standard set of badges

Via CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to the previous release.

Comments and suggestions about AsioHeaders are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub GitHub repo.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Gunnar Wolf: Raspberry Pi 4, now running your favorite distribution!

7 July, 2020 - 14:00

Great news, great news! New images available!Grab them while they are hot!

With lots of help (say, all of the heavy lifting) from the Debian Raspberry Pi Maintainer Team, we have finally managed to provide support for auto-building and serving bootable minimal Debian images for the Raspberry Pi 4 family of single-board, cheap, small, hacker-friendly computers!

The Raspberry Pi 4 was released close to a year ago, and is a very major bump in the Raspberry lineup; it took us this long because we needed to wait until all of the relevant bits entered Debian (mostly the kernel bits). The images are shipping a kernel from our Unstable branch (currently, 5.7.0-2), and are less tested and more likely to break than our regular, clean-Stable images. Nevertheless, we do expect them to be useful for many hackers –and even end-users– throughout the world.

The images we are generating are very minimal, they carry basically a minimal Debian install. Once downloaded, of course, you can install whatever your heart desires (because… Face it, if your heart desires it, it must free and of high quality. It must already be in Debian!)

Oh — And very important: Due to a change in the memory layout, if you get the 8GB model (currently the top-of-the-line RPi4), it will still not have USB support, due to a change in its memory layout (that means, no local keyboard/mouse ☹). We are working on getting it ironed out!

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp 1.0.5: Several Updates

6 July, 2020 - 22:43

Right on the heels of the news of 2000 CRAN packages using Rcpp (and also hitting 12.5 of CRAN package, or one in eight), we are happy to announce release 1.0.5 of Rcpp. Since the ten-year anniversary and the 1.0.0 release release in November 2018, we have been sticking to a four-month release cycle. The last release has, however, left us with a particularly bad taste due to some rather peculiar interactions with a very small (but ever so vocal) portion of the user base. So going forward, we will change two things. First off, we reiterate that we have already made rolling releases. Each minor snapshot of the main git branch gets a point releases. Between release 1.0.4 and this 1.0.5 release, there were in fact twelve of those. Each and every one of these was made available via the drat repo, and we will continue to do so going forward. Releases to CRAN, however, are real work. If they then end up with as much nonsense as the last release 1.0.4, we think it is appropriate to slow things down some more so we intend to now switch to a six-months cycle. As mentioned, interim releases are always just one install.packages() call with a properly set repos argument away.

Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. As of today, 2002 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 203 in BioConductor. And per the (partial) logs of CRAN downloads, we are running steady at around one millions downloads per month.

This release features again a number of different pull requests by different contributors covering the full range of API improvements, attributes enhancements, changes to Sugar and helper functions, extended documentation as well as continuous integration deplayment. See the list below for details.

Changes in Rcpp patch release version 1.0.5 (2020-07-01)
  • Changes in Rcpp API:

    • The exception handler code in #1043 was updated to ensure proper include behavior (Kevin in #1047 fixing #1046).

    • A missing Rcpp_list6 definition was added to support R 3.3.* builds (Davis Vaughan in #1049 fixing #1048).

    • Missing Rcpp_list{2,3,4,5} definition were added to the Rcpp namespace (Dirk in #1054 fixing #1053).

    • A further updated corrected the header include and provided a missing else branch (Mattias Ellert in #1055).

    • Two more assignments are protected with Rcpp::Shield (Dirk in #1059).

    • One call to abs is now properly namespaced with std:: (Uwe Korn in #1069).

    • String object memory preservation was corrected/simplified (Kevin in #1082).

  • Changes in Rcpp Attributes:

    • Empty strings are not passed to R CMD SHLIB which was seen with R 4.0.0 on Windows (Kevin in #1062 fixing #1061).

    • The short_file_name() helper function is safer with respect to temporaries (Kevin in #1067 fixing #1066, and #1071 fixing #1070).

  • Changes in Rcpp Sugar:

    • Two sample() objects are now standard vectors and not R_alloc created (Dirk in #1075 fixing #1074).
  • Changes in Rcpp support functions:

    • Rcpp.package.skeleton() adjusts for a (documented) change in R 4.0.0 (Dirk in #1088 fixing #1087).
  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:

    • The pdf file of the earlier introduction is again typeset with bibliographic information (Dirk).

    • A new vignette describing how to package C++ libraries has been added (Dirk in #1078 fixing #1077).

  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:

    • Travis CI unit tests now run a matrix over the versions of R also tested at CRAN (rel/dev/oldrel/oldoldrel), and coverage runs in parallel for a net speed-up (Dirk in #1056 and #1057).

    • The exceptions test is now partially skipped on Solaris as it already is on Windows (Dirk in #1065).

    • The default CI runner was upgraded to R 4.0.0 (Dirk).

    • The CI matrix spans R 3.5, 3.6, r-release and r-devel (Dirk).

Thanks to CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2455 previous questions.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Jonathan Dowland: Review: Roku Express

6 July, 2020 - 16:55

I don't generally write consumer reviews, here or elsewhere; but I have been so impressed by this one I wanted to mention it.

For Holly's birthday this year, taking place under Lockdown, we decided to buy a year's subscription to "Disney+". Our current TV receiver (A Humax Freesat box) doesn't support it so I needed to find some other way to get it onto the TV.

After a short bit of research, I bought the "Roku Express" streaming media player. This is the most basic streamer that Roku make, bottom of their range. For a little bit more money you can get a model which supports 4K (although my TV obviously doesn't: it, and the basic Roku, top out at 1080p) and a bit more gets you a "stick" form-factor and a Bluetooth remote (rather than line-of-sight IR).

I paid £20 for the most basic model and it Just Works. The receiver is very small but sits comfortably next to my satellite receiver-box. I don't have any issues with line-of-sight for the IR remote (and I rely on a regular IR remote for the TV itself of course). It supports Disney+, but also all the other big name services, some of which we already use (Netflix, YouTube BBC iPlayer) and some of which we didn't, since it was too awkward to access them (Google Play, Amazon Prime Video). It has now largely displaced the FreeSat box for accessing streaming content because it works so well and everything is in one place.

There's a phone App that remote-controls the box and works even better than the physical remote: it can offer a full phone-keyboard at times when you need to input text, and can mute the TV audio and put it out through headphones attached to the phone if you want.

My aging Plasma TV suffers from burn-in from static pictures. If left paused for a duration the Roku goes to a screensaver that keeps the whole frame moving. The FreeSat doesn't do this. My Blu Ray player does, but (I think) it retains some static elements.

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in June 2020

6 July, 2020 - 15:11

Welcome to the June 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In these reports we outline the most important things that we and the rest of the community have been up to over the past month.

What are reproducible builds?

One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security.

But whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into seemingly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes.

News

The GitHub Security Lab published a long article on the discovery of a piece of malware designed to backdoor open source projects that used the build process and its resulting artifacts to spread itself. In the course of their analysis and investigation, the GitHub team uncovered 26 open source projects that were backdoored by this malware and were actively serving malicious code. (Full article)

Carl Dong from Chaincode Labs uploaded a presentation on Bitcoin Build System Security and reproducible builds to YouTube:

The app intended to trace infection chains of Covid-19 in Switzerland published information on how to perform a reproducible build.

The Reproducible Builds project has received funding in the past from the Open Technology Fund (OTF) to reach specific technical goals, as well as to enable the project to meet in-person at our summits. The OTF has actually also assisted countless other organisations that promote transparent, civil society as well as those that provide tools to circumvent censorship and repressive surveillance. However, the OTF has now been threatened with closure. (More info)

It was noticed that Reproducible Builds was mentioned in the book End-user Computer Security by Mark Fernandes (published by WikiBooks) in the section titled Detection of malware in software.

Lastly, reproducible builds and other ideas around software supply chain were mentioned in a recent episode of the Ubuntu Podcast in a wider discussion about the Snap and application stores (at approx 16:00).


Distribution work

In the ArchLinux distribution, a goal to remove .doctrees from installed files was created via Arch’s ‘TODO list’ mechanism. These .doctree files are caches generated by the Sphinx documentation generator when developing documentation so that Sphinx does not have to reparse all input files across runs. They should not be packaged, especially as they lead to the package being unreproducible as their pickled format contains unreproducible data. Jelle van der Waa and Eli Schwartz submitted various upstream patches to fix projects that install these by default.

Dimitry Andric was able to determine why the reproducibility status of FreeBSD’s base.txz depended on the number of CPU cores, attributing it to an optimisation made to the Clang C compiler []. After further detailed discussion on the FreeBSD bug it was possible to get the binaries reproducible again [].

In March 2018, a wishlist request was filed for the NixOS distribution by Bryan Alexander Rivera touching on how to install specific/deterministic versions of packages which was closed with “won’t fix” resolution this month.

For the GNU Guix operating system, Vagrant Cascadian started a thread about collecting reproducibility metrics and Jan “janneke” Nieuwenhuizen posted that they had further reduced their “bootstrap seed” to 25% which is intended to reduce the amount of code to be audited to avoid potential compiler backdoors.

In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update as well as made the following changes within the distribution itself:

Debian

Holger Levsen filed three bugs (#961857, #961858 & #961859) against the reproducible-check tool that reports on the reproducible status of installed packages on a running Debian system. They were subsequently all fixed by Chris Lamb [][][].

Timo Röhling filed a wishlist bug against the debhelper build tool impacting the reproducibility status of 100s of packages that use the CMake build system which led to a number of tests and next steps. []

Chris Lamb contributed to a conversation regarding the nondeterministic execution of order of Debian maintainer scripts that results in the arbitrary allocation of UNIX group IDs, referencing the Tails operating system’s approach this []. Vagrant Cascadian also added to a discussion regarding verification formats for reproducible builds.

47 reviews of Debian packages were added, 37 were updated and 69 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Chris Lamb identified and classified a new uids_gids_in_tarballs_generated_by_cmake_kde_package_app_templates issue [] and updated the paths_vary_due_to_usrmerge as deterministic issue, and Vagrant Cascadian updated the cmake_rpath_contains_build_path and gcc_captures_build_path issues. [][][].

Lastly, Debian Developer Bill Allombert started a mailing list thread regarding setting the -fdebug-prefix-map command-line argument via an environment variable and Holger Levsen also filed three bugs against the debrebuild Debian package rebuilder tool (#961861, #961862 & #961864).

Development

On our website this month, Arnout Engelen added a link to our Mastodon account [] and moved the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH git log example to another section []. Chris Lamb also limited the number of news posts to avoid showing items from (for example) 2017 [].

strip-nondeterminism is our tool to remove specific non-deterministic results from a completed build. It is used automatically in most Debian package builds. This month, Mattia Rizzolo bumped the debhelper compatibility level to 13 [] and adjusted a related dependency to avoid potential circular dependency [].

Upstream work

The Reproducible Builds project attempts to fix unreproducible packages and we try to to send all of our patches upstream. This month, we wrote a large number of such patches including:

Bernhard M. Wiedemann also filed reports for frr (build fails on single-processor machines), ghc-yesod-static/git-annex (a filesystem ordering issue) and ooRexx (ASLR-related issue).

diffoscope

diffoscope is our in-depth ‘diff-on-steroids’ utility which helps us diagnose reproducibility issues in packages. It does not define reproducibility, but rather provides a helpful and human-readable guidance for packages that are not reproducible, rather than relying essentially-useless binary diffs.

This month, Chris Lamb uploaded versions 147, 148 and 149 to Debian and made the following changes:

  • New features:

    • Add output from strings(1) to ELF binaries. (#148)
    • Dump PE32+ executables (such as EFI applications) using objdump(1). (#181)
    • Add support for Zsh shell completion. (#158)
  • Bug fixes:

    • Prevent a traceback when comparing PDF documents that did not contain metadata (ie. a PDF /Info stanza). (#150)
    • Fix compatibility with jsondiff version 1.2.0. (#159)
    • Fix an issue in GnuPG keybox file handling that left filenames in the diff. []
    • Correct detection of JSON files due to missing call to File.recognizes that checks candidates against file(1). []
  • Output improvements:

    • Use the CSS word-break property over manually adding U+200B zero-width spaces as these were making copy-pasting cumbersome. (!53)
    • Downgrade the tlsh warning message to an ‘info’ level warning. (#29)
  • Logging improvements:

  • Testsuite improvements:

    • Update tests for file(1) version 5.39. (#179)
    • Drop accidentally-duplicated copy of the --diff-mask tests. []
    • Don’t mask an existing test. []
  • Codebase improvements:

    • Replace obscure references to WF with “Wagner-Fischer” for clarity. []
    • Use a semantic AbstractMissingType type instead of remembering to check for both types of ‘missing’ files. []
    • Add a comment regarding potential security issue in the .changes, .dsc and .buildinfo comparators. []
    • Drop a large number of unused imports. [][][][][]
    • Make many code sections more Pythonic. [][][][]
    • Prevent some variable aliasing issues. [][][]
    • Use some tactical f-strings to tidy up code [][] and remove explicit u"unicode" strings [].
    • Refactor a large number of routines for clarity. [][][][]

trydiffoscope is the web-based version of diffoscope. This month, Chris Lamb also corrected the location for the celerybeat scheduler to ensure that the clean/tidy tasks are actually called which had caused an accidental resource exhaustion. (#12)

In addition Jean-Romain Garnier made the following changes:

  • Fix the --new-file option when comparing directories by merging DirectoryContainer.compare and Container.compare. (#180)
  • Allow user to mask/filter diff output via --diff-mask=REGEX. (!51)
  • Make child pages open in new window in the --html-dir presenter format. []
  • Improve the diffs in the --html-dir format. [][]

Lastly, Daniel Fullmer fixed the Coreboot filesystem comparator [] and Mattia Rizzolo prevented warnings from the tlsh fuzzy-matching library during tests [] and tweaked the build system to remove an unwanted .build directory []. For the GNU Guix distribution Vagrant Cascadian updated the version of diffoscope to version 147 [] and later 148 [].

Testing framework

We operate a large and many-featured Jenkins-based testing framework that powers tests.reproducible-builds.org. Amongst many other tasks, this tracks the status of our reproducibility efforts across many distributions as well as identifies any regressions that have been introduced. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:

  • Debian-related changes:

    • Prevent bogus failure emails from rsync2buildinfos.debian.net every night. []
    • Merge a fix from David Bremner’s database of .buildinfo files to include a fix regarding comparing source vs. binary package versions. []
    • Only run the Debian package rebuilder job twice per day. []
    • Increase bullseye scheduling. []
  • System health status page:

    • Add a note displaying whether a node needs to be rebooted for a kernel upgrade. []
    • Fix sorting order of failed jobs. []
    • Expand footer to link to the related Jenkins job. []
    • Add archlinux_html_pages, openwrt_rebuilder_today and openwrt_rebuilder_future to ‘known broken’ jobs. []
    • Add HTML <meta> header to refresh the page every 5 minutes. []
    • Count the number of ignored jobs [], ignore permanently ‘known broken’ jobs [] and jobs on ‘known offline’ nodes [].
    • Only consider the ‘known offline’ status from Git. []
    • Various output improvements. [][]
  • Tools:

    • Switch URLs for the Grml Live Linux and PureOS package sets. [][]
    • Don’t try to build a disorderfs Debian source package. [][][]
    • Stop building diffoscope as we are moving this to Salsa. [][]
    • Merge several “is diffoscope up-to-date on every platform?” test jobs into one [] and fail less noisily if the version in Debian cannot be determined [].

In addition: Marcus Hoffmann was added as a maintainer of the F-Droid reproducible checking components [], Jelle van der Waa updated the “is diffoscope up-to-date in every platform” check for Arch Linux and diffoscope [], Mattia Rizzolo backed up a copy of a “remove script” run on the Codethink-hosted ‘jump server‘ [] and Vagrant Cascadian temporarily disabled the fixfilepath on bullseye, to get better data about the ftbfs_due_to_f-file-prefix-map categorised issue.

Lastly, the usual build node maintenance was performed by Holger Levsen [][], Mattia Rizzolo [] and Vagrant Cascadian [][][][][].


If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

This month’s report was written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann, Chris Lamb, Eli Schwartz, Holger Levsen, Jelle van der Waa and Vagrant Cascadian. It was subsequently reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC and the mailing list.

Enrico Zini: COVID-19 and Capitalism

6 July, 2020 - 05:00
Astroturfing: How To Spot A Fake Movement capitalism covid19 news politics Crowds on Demand - Protests, Rallies and Advocacy archive.org 2020-07-06 If the Reopen America protests seem a little off to you, that's because they are. In this video we're going to talk about astroturfing and how insidious it i... Volunteers 3D-Print Unobtainable $11,000 Valve For $1 To Keep Covid-19 Patients Alive; Original Manufacturer Threatens To Sue capitalism covid19 health news Volunteers produce 3D-printed valves for life-saving coronavirus treatments archive.org 2020-07-06 Techdirt has just written about the extraordinary legal action taken against a company producing Covid-19 tests. Sadly, it's not the only example of some individuals putting profits before people. Here's a story from Italy, which is... Germany tries to stop US from luring away firm seeking coronavirus vaccine capitalism covid19 health news archive.org 2020-07-06 Berlin is trying to stop Washington from persuading a German company seeking a coronavirus vaccine to move its research to the United States. He Has 17,700 Bottles of Hand Sanitizer and Nowhere to Sell Them capitalism covid19 news archive.org 2020-07-06 Amazon cracked down on coronavirus price gouging. Now, while the rest of the world searches, some sellers are holding stockpiles of sanitizer and masks. Theranos vampire lives on: Owner of failed blood-testing biz's patents sues maker of actual COVID-19-testing kit capitalism covid19 news archive.org 2020-07-06 And 3D-printed valve for breathing machine sparks legal threat How an Austrian ski paradise became a COVID-19 hotspot capitalism covid19 news archive.org 2020-07-06 Ischgl, an Austrian ski resort, has achieved tragic international fame: hundreds of tourists are believed to have contracted the coronavirus there and taken it home with them. The Tyrolean state government is now facing serious criticism. EURACTIV Germany reports. Hospitals Need to Repair Ventilators. Manufacturers Are Making That Impossible capitalism covid19 health news archive.org 2020-07-06 We are seeing how the monopolistic repair and lobbying practices of medical device companies are making our response to the coronavirus pandemic harder. Homeless people in Las Vegas sleep 6 feet apart in parking lot as thousands of hotel rooms sit empty capitalism covid19 news privilege archive.org 2020-07-06 Las Vegas, Nevada has come under criticism after reportedly setting up a temporary homeless shelter in a parking lot complete with social distancing barriers.

Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2020

5 July, 2020 - 21:13

FTP master

This month I accepted 377 packages and rejected 30. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 411.

Debian LTS

This was my seventy-second month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

This month my all in all workload has been 30h. During that time I did LTS uploads of:

  • [DLA 2255-1] libtasn1-6 security update for one CVE
  • [DLA 2256-1] libtirpc security update for one CVE
  • [DLA 2257-1] pngquant security update for one CVE
  • [DLA 2258-1] zziplib security update for eight CVEs
  • [DLA 2259-1] picocom security update for one CVE
  • [DLA 2260-1] mcabber security update for one CVE
  • [DLA 2261-1] php5 security update for one CVE

I started to work on curl as well but did not upload a fixed version, so this has to go to ELTS now.

Last but not least I did some days of frontdesk duties.

Debian ELTS

This month was the twenty fourth ELTS month.

Unfortunately in the last month of Wheezy ELTS even I did not find any package to fix a CVE, so during my small allocated time I didn’t uploaded anything.

But at least I did some days of frontdesk duties und updated my working environment for the new ELTS Jessie.

Other stuff

I uploaded a new upstream version of …

Russell Coker: Debian S390X Emulation

5 July, 2020 - 09:58

I decided to setup some virtual machines for different architectures. One that I decided to try was S390X – the latest 64bit version of the IBM mainframe. Here’s how to do it, I tested on a host running Debian/Unstable but Buster should work in the same way.

First you need to create a filesystem in an an image file with commands like the following:

truncate -s 4g /vmstore/s390x
mkfs.ext4 /vmstore/s390x
mount -o loop /vmstore/s390x /mnt/tmp

Then visit the Debian Netinst page [1] to download the S390X net install ISO. Then loopback mount it somewhere convenient like /mnt/tmp2.

The package qemu-system-misc has the program for emulating a S390X system (among many others), the qemu-user-static package has the program for emulating S390X for a single program (IE a statically linked program or a chroot environment), you need this to run debootstrap. The following commands should be most of what you need.

# Install the basic packages you need
apt install qemu-system-misc qemu-user-static debootstrap

# List the support for different binary formats
update-binfmts --display

# qemu s390x needs exec stack to solve "Could not allocate dynamic translator buffer"
# so you probably need this on SE Linux systems
setsebool allow_execstack 1

# commands to do the main install
debootstrap --foreign --arch=s390x --no-check-gpg buster /mnt/tmp file:///mnt/tmp2
chroot /mnt/tmp /debootstrap/debootstrap --second-stage

# set the apt sources
cat << END > /mnt/tmp/etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://YOURLOCALMIRROR/pub/debian/ buster main
deb http://security.debian.org/ buster/updates main
END
# for minimal install do not want recommended packages
echo "APT::Install-Recommends False;" > /mnt/tmp/etc/apt/apt.conf

# update to latest packages
chroot /mnt/tmp apt update
chroot /mnt/tmp apt dist-upgrade

# install kernel, ssh, and build-essential
chroot /mnt/tmp apt install bash-completion locales linux-image-s390x man-db openssh-server build-essential
chroot /mnt/tmp dpkg-reconfigure locales
echo s390x > /mnt/tmp/etc/hostname
chroot /mnt/tmp passwd

# copy kernel and initrd
mkdir -p /boot/s390x
cp /mnt/tmp/boot/vmlinuz* /mnt/tmp/boot/initrd* /boot/s390x

# setup /etc/fstab
cat << END > /mnt/tmp/etc/fstab
/dev/vda / ext4 noatime 0 0
#/dev/vdb none swap defaults 0 0
END

# clean up
umount /mnt/tmp
umount /mnt/tmp2

# setcap binary for starting bridged networking
setcap cap_net_admin+ep /usr/lib/qemu/qemu-bridge-helper

# afterwards set the access on /etc/qemu/bridge.conf so it can only
# be read by the user/group permitted to start qemu/kvm
echo "allow all" > /etc/qemu/bridge.conf

Some of the above can be considered more as pseudo-code in shell script rather than an exact way of doing things. While you can copy and past all the above into a command line and have a reasonable chance of having it work I think it would be better to look at each command and decide whether it’s right for you and whether you need to alter it slightly for your system.

To run qemu as non-root you need to have a helper program with extra capabilities to setup bridged networking. I’ve included that in the explanation because I think it’s important to have all security options enabled.

The “-object rng-random,filename=/dev/urandom,id=rng0 -device virtio-rng-ccw,rng=rng0” part is to give entropy to the VM from the host, otherwise it will take ages to start sshd. Note that this is slightly but significantly different from the command used for other architectures (the “ccw” is the difference).

I’m not sure if “noresume” on the kernel command line is required, but it doesn’t do any harm. The “net.ifnames=0” stops systemd from renaming Ethernet devices. For the virtual networking the “ccw” again is a difference from other architectures.

Here is a basic command to run a QEMU virtual S390X system. If all goes well it should give you a login: prompt on a curses based text display, you can then login as root and should be able to run “dhclient eth0” and other similar commands to setup networking and allow ssh logins.

qemu-system-s390x -drive format=raw,file=/vmstore/s390x,if=virtio -object rng-random,filename=/dev/urandom,id=rng0 -device virtio-rng-ccw,rng=rng0 -nographic -m 1500 -smp 2 -kernel /boot/s390x/vmlinuz-4.19.0-9-s390x -initrd /boot/s390x/initrd.img-4.19.0-9-s390x -curses -append "net.ifnames=0 noresume root=/dev/vda ro" -device virtio-net-ccw,netdev=net0,mac=02:02:00:00:01:02 -netdev tap,id=net0,helper=/usr/lib/qemu/qemu-bridge-helper

Here is a slightly more complete QEMU command. It has 2 block devices, for root and swap. It has SE Linux enabled for the VM (SE Linux works nicely on S390X). I added the “lockdown=confidentiality” kernel security option even though it’s not supported in 4.19 kernels, it doesn’t do any harm and when I upgrade systems to newer kernels I won’t have to remember to add it.

qemu-system-s390x -drive format=raw,file=/vmstore/s390x,if=virtio -drive format=raw,file=/vmswap/s390x,if=virtio -object rng-random,filename=/dev/urandom,id=rng0 -device virtio-rng-ccw,rng=rng0 -nographic -m 1500 -smp 2 -kernel /boot/s390x/vmlinuz-4.19.0-9-s390x -initrd /boot/s390x/initrd.img-4.19.0-9-s390x -curses -append "net.ifnames=0 noresume security=selinux root=/dev/vda ro lockdown=confidentiality" -device virtio-net-ccw,netdev=net0,mac=02:02:00:00:01:02 -netdev tap,id=net0,helper=/usr/lib/qemu/qemu-bridge-helper
Try It Out

I’ve got a S390X system online for a while, “ssh root@s390x.coker.com.au” with password “SELINUX” to try it out.

PPC64

I’ve tried running a PPC64 virtual machine, I did the same things to set it up and then tried launching it with the following result:

qemu-system-ppc64 -drive format=raw,file=/vmstore/ppc64,if=virtio -nographic -m 1024 -kernel /boot/ppc64/vmlinux-4.19.0-9-powerpc64le -initrd /boot/ppc64/initrd.img-4.19.0-9-powerpc64le -curses -append "root=/dev/vda ro"

Above is the minimal qemu command that I’m using. Below is the result, it stops after the “4.” from “4.19.0-9”. Note that I had originally tried with a more complete and usable set of options, but I trimmed it to the minimal needed to demonstrate the problem.

  Copyright (c) 2004, 2017 IBM Corporation All rights reserved.
  This program and the accompanying materials are made available
  under the terms of the BSD License available at
  http://www.opensource.org/licenses/bsd-license.php

Booting from memory...
Linux ppc64le
#1 SMP Debian 4.

The kernel is from the package linux-image-4.19.0-9-powerpc64le which is a dependency of the package linux-image-ppc64el in Debian/Buster. The program qemu-system-ppc64 is from version 5.0-5 of the qemu-system-ppc package.

Any suggestions on what I should try next would be appreciated.

Related posts:

  1. installing Xen domU on Debian Etch I have just been installing a Xen domU on Debian...
  2. Ext4 and Debian/Lenny I want to use the Ext4 filesystem on Xen DomUs....
  3. QEMU for ARM Processes I’m currently doing some embedded work on ARM systems. Having...

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp now used by 2000 CRAN packages–and one in eight!

5 July, 2020 - 05:20

As of yesterday, Rcpp stands at exactly 2000 reverse-dependencies on CRAN. The graph on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo, but excluding Suggests) over time.

Rcpp was first released in November 2008. It probably cleared 50 packages around three years later in December 2011, 100 packages in January 2013, 200 packages in April 2014, and 300 packages in November 2014. It passed 400 packages in June 2015 (when I tweeted about it), 500 packages in late October 2015, 600 packages in March 2016, 700 packages last July 2016, 800 packages last October 2016, 900 packages early January 2017, 1000 packages in April 2017, 1250 packages in November 2017, 1500 packages in November 2018 and then 1750 packages last August. The chart extends to the very beginning via manually compiled data from CRANberries and checked with crandb. The next part uses manually saved entries. The core (and by far largest) part of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of packages using Rcpp is available too.

Also displayed in the graph is the relative proportion of CRAN packages using Rcpp. The four per-cent hurdle was cleared just before useR! 2014 where I showed a similar graph (as two distinct graphs) in my invited talk. We passed five percent in December of 2014, six percent July of 2015, seven percent just before Christmas 2015, eight percent in the summer of 2016, nine percent mid-December 2016, cracked ten percent in the summer of 2017 and eleven percent in 2018. We now passed 12.5 percent—so one in every eight CRAN packages dependens on Rcpp. Stunning. There is more detail in the chart: how CRAN seems to be pushing back more and removing more aggressively (which my CRANberries tracks but not in as much detail as it could), how the growth of Rcpp seems to be slowing somewhat outright and even more so as a proportion of CRAN – as one would expect a growth curve to.

To mark the occassion, I sent out two tweets yesterday: first a shorter one with “just the numbers”, followed by a second one also containing the few calculation steps. The screenshot from the second one is below.

2000 user packages is pretty mind-boggling. We can use the progression of CRAN itself compiled by Henrik in a series of posts and emails to the main development mailing list. Not that long ago CRAN itself did have only 1000 packages, then 5000, 10000, and here we are at just over 16000 with Rcpp at 12.5% and still growing (though maybe more slowly). Amazeballs.

The Rcpp team continues to aim for keeping Rcpp as performant and reliable as it has been. A really big shoutout and Thank You! to all users and contributors of Rcpp for help, suggestions, bug reports, documentation or, of course, code.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Petter Reinholdtsen: Working on updated Norwegian Bokmål edition of Debian Administrator's Handbook

5 July, 2020 - 04:55

Three years ago, the first Norwegian Bokmål edition of "The Debian Administrator's Handbook" was published. This was based on Debian Jessie. Now a new and updated version based on Buster is getting ready. Work on the updated Norwegian Bokmål edition has been going on for a few months now, and yesterday, we reached the first mile stone, with 100% of the texts being translated. A lot of proof reading remains, of course, but a major step towards a new edition has been taken.

The book is translated by volunteers, and we would love to get some help with the proof reading. The translation uses the hosted Weblate service, and we welcome everyone to have a look and submit improvements and suggestions. There is also a proof readers PDF available on request, get in touch if you want to help out that way.

As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

Russ Allbery: Review: The Light Brigade

4 July, 2020 - 10:49

Review: The Light Brigade, by Kameron Hurley

Publisher: Saga Copyright: 2019 ISBN: 1-4814-4798-X Format: Kindle Pages: 355

In the wake of the Blink, which left a giant crater where São Paulo was, Dietz signed up for the military. To be a hero. To satisfy an oath of vengeance. To kill aliens.

Corporations have consumed the governments that used to run Earth and have divided the world between them. Dietz's family, before the Blink, were ghouls in Tene-Silva territory, non-citizens who scavenged a precarious life on the margins. Citizenship is a reward for loyalty and a mechanism of control. The only people who don't fit into the corporate framework are the Martians, former colonists who went dark for ten years and re-emerged as a splinter group offering to use their superior technology to repair environmental damage to the northern hemisphere caused by corporate wars. When the Blink happens, apparently done with technology far beyond what the corporations have, corporate war with the Martians is the unsurprising result.

Long-time SF readers will immediately recognize The Light Brigade as a response to Starship Troopers with far more cynical world-building. For the first few chapters, the parallelism is very strong, down to the destruction of a large South American city (São Paulo instead of Buenos Aires), a naive military volunteer, and horrific basic training. But, rather than dropships, the soldiers in Dietz's world are sent into battle via, essentially, Star Trek transporters. These still very experimental transporters send Dietz to a different mission than the one in the briefing.

Advance warning that I'm going to talk about what's happening with Dietz's drops below. It's a spoiler, but you would find out not far into the book and I don't think it ruins anything important. (On the contrary, it may give you an incentive to stick through the slow and unappealing first few chapters.)

I had so many suspension of disbelief problems with this book. So many.

This starts with the technology. The core piece of world-building is Star Trek transporters, so fine, we're not talking about hard physics. Every SF story gets one or two free bits of impossible technology, and Hurley does a good job showing the transporters through a jaundiced military eye. But, late in the book, this technology devolves into one of my least-favorite bits of SF hand-waving that, for me, destroyed that gritty edge.

Technology problems go beyond the transporters. One of the bits of horror in basic training is, essentially, torture simulators, whose goal is apparently to teach soldiers to dissociate (not that the book calls it that). One problem is that I never understood why a military would want to teach dissociation to so many people, but a deeper problem is that the mechanics of this simulation made no sense. Dietz's training in this simulator is a significant ongoing plot point, and it kept feeling like it was cribbed from The Matrix rather than something translatable into how computers work.

Technology was the more minor suspension of disbelief problem, though. The larger problem was the political and social world-building.

Hurley constructs a grim, totalitarian future, which is a fine world-building choice although I think it robs some nuance from the story she is telling about how militaries lie to soldiers. But the totalitarian model she uses is one of near-total information control. People believe what the corporations tell them to believe, or at least are indifferent to it. Huge world events (with major plot significance) are distorted or outright lies, and those lies are apparently believed by everyone. The skepticism that exists is limited to grumbling about leadership competence and cynicism about motives, not disagreement with the provided history. This is critical to the story; it's a driver behind Dietz's character growth and is required to set up the story's conclusion.

This is a model of totalitarianism that's familiar from Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The problem: The Internet broke this model. You now need North Korean levels of isolation to pull off total message control, which is incompatible with the social structure or technology level that Hurley shows.

You may be objecting that the modern world is full of people who believe outrageous propaganda against all evidence. But the world-building problem is not that some people believe the corporate propaganda. It's that everyone does. Modern totalitarians have stopped trying to achieve uniformity (because it stopped working) and instead make the disagreement part of the appeal. You no longer get half a country to believe a lie by ensuring they never hear the truth. Instead, you equate belief in the lie with loyalty to a social or political group, and belief in the truth with affiliation with some enemy. This goes hand in hand with "flooding the zone" with disinformation and fakes and wild stories until people's belief in the accessibility of objective truth is worn down and all facts become ideological statements. This does work, all too well, but it relies on more information, not less. (See Zeynep Tufekci's excellent Twitter and Tear Gas if you're unfamiliar with this analysis.) In that world, Dietz would have heard the official history, the true history, and all sorts of wild alternative histories, making correct belief a matter of political loyalty. There is no sign of that.

Hurley does gesture towards some technology to try to explain this surprising corporate effectiveness. All the soldiers have implants, and military censors can supposedly listen in at any time. But, in the story, this censorship is primarily aimed at grumbling and local disloyalty. There is no sign that it's being used to keep knowledge of significant facts from spreading, nor is there any sign of the same control among the general population. It's stated in the story that the censors can't even keep up with soldiers; one would have to get unlucky to be caught. And yet the corporation maintains preternatural information control.

The place this bugged me the most is around knowledge of the current date. For reasons that will be obvious in a moment, Dietz has reasons to badly want to know what month and year it is and is unable to find this information anywhere. This appears to be intentional; Tene-Silva has a good (albeit not that urgent) reason to keep soldiers from knowing the date. But I don't think Hurley realizes just how hard that is.

Take a look around the computer you're using to read this and think about how many places the date shows up. Apart from the ubiquitous clock and calendar app, there are dates on every file, dates on every news story, dates on search results, dates in instant messages, dates on email messages and voice mail... they're everywhere. And it's not just the computer. The soldiers can easily smuggle prohibited outside goods into the base; knowledge of the date would be much easier. And even if Dietz doesn't want to ask anyone, there are opportunities to go off base during missions. Somehow every newspaper and every news bulletin has its dates suppressed? It's not credible, and it threw me straight out of the story.

These world-building problems are unfortunate, since at the heart of The Light Brigade is a (spoiler alert) well-constructed time travel story that I would have otherwise enjoyed. Dietz is being tossed around in time with each jump. And, unlike some of these stories, Hurley does not take the escape hatch of alternate worlds or possible futures. There is a single coherent timeline that Dietz and the reader experience in one order and the rest of the world experiences in a different order.

The construction of this timeline is incredibly well-done. Time can only disconnect at jump and return points, and Hurley maintains tight control over the number of unresolved connections. At every point in the story, I could list all of the unresolved discontinuities and enjoy their complexity and implications without feeling overwhelmed by them. Dietz gains some foreknowledge, but in a way that's wildly erratic and hard to piece together fast enough for a single soldier to do anything about the plot. The world spins out of control with foreshadowing of grimmer and grimmer events, and then Hurley pulls it back together in a thoroughly satisfying interweaving of long-anticipated scenes and major surprises.

I'm not usually a fan of time travel stories, but this is one of the best I've read. It also has a satisfying emotional conclusion (albeit marred for me by some unbelievable mystical technobabble), which is impressive given how awful and nasty Hurley makes this world. Dietz is a great first-person narrator, believably naive and cynical by turns, and piecing together the story structure alongside the protagonist built my emotional attachment to Dietz's character arc. Hurley writes the emotional dynamics of soldiers thoughtfully and well: shit-talking, fights, sudden moments of connection, shared cynicism over degenerating conditions, and the underlying growth of squad loyalty that takes over other motivations and becomes the reason to keep on fighting.

Hurley also pulled off a neat homage to (and improvement on) Starship Troopers that caught me entirely by surprise and that I've hopefully not spoiled.

This is a solid science fiction novel if you can handle the world-building. I couldn't, but I understand why it was nominated for the Hugo and Clarke awards. Recommended if you're less picky about technological and social believability than I am, although content warning for a lot of bloody violence and death (including against children) and a horrifically depressing world.

Rating: 6 out of 10

Michael Prokop: Grml 2020.06 – Codename Ausgehfuahangl

3 July, 2020 - 21:32

We did it again™, at the end of June we released Grml 2020.06, codename Ausgehfuahangl. This Grml release (a Linux live system for system administrators) is based on Debian/testing (AKA bullseye) and provides current software packages as of June, incorporates up to date hardware support and fixes known issues from previous Grml releases.

I am especially fond of our cloud-init and qemu-guest-agent integration, which makes usage and automation in virtual environments like Proxmox VE much more comfortable.

Once as the Qemu Guest Agent setting is enabled in the VM options (also see Proxmox wiki), you’ll see IP address information in the VM summary:

Using a cloud-init drive allows using an SSH key for login as user "grml", and you can control network settings as well:

It was fun to focus and work on this new Grml release together with Darsha, and we hope you enjoy the new Grml release as much as we do!

Norbert Preining: KDE/Plasma Status Update 2020-07-04

3 July, 2020 - 21:06

Great timing for 4th of July, here is another status update of KDE/Plasma for Debian. Short summary: everything is now available for Debian sid and testing, for both i386 and am64 architectures!

With Qt 5.14 arriving in Debian/testing, and some tweaks here and there, we finally have all the packages (2 additional deps, 82 frameworks, 47 Plasma, 216 Apps) built on both Debian unstable and Debian testing, for both amd64 and i386 architectures. Again, big thanks to OBS!

Repositories:
For Unstable:

deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/other-deps/Debian_Unstable/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/frameworks/Debian_Unstable/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/plasma519/Debian_Unstable/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/apps/Debian_Unstable/ ./

For Testing:

deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/other-deps/Debian_Testing/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/frameworks/Debian_Testing/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/plasma519/Debian_Testing/ ./
deb https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/npreining:/debian-kde:/apps/Debian_Testing/ ./

As usual, don’t forget that you need to import my OBS gpg key: obs-npreining.asc, best to download it and put the file into /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/obs-npreining.asc.

Enjoy.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: #28: Welcome RSPM and test-drive with Bionic and Focal

3 July, 2020 - 20:05

Welcome to the 28th post in the relatively random R recommendations series, or R4 for short. Our last post was a “double entry” in this R4 series and the newer T4 video series and covered a topic touched upon in this R4 series multiple times: easy binary install, especially on Ubuntu.

That post already previewed the newest kid on the block: RStudio’s RSPM, now formally announced. In the post we were only able to show Ubuntu 18.04 aka bionic. With the formal release of RSPM support has been added for Ubuntu 20.04 aka focal—and we are happy to announce that of course we added a corresponding Rocker r-rspm container. So you can now take full advantage of RSPM either via docker pull rocker/r-rspm:18.04 or via docker pull rocker/r-rspm:20.04 covering the two most recent LTS releases.

RSPM is a nice accomplishment. Covering multiple Linux distributions is an excellent achievement. Allowing users to reason in terms of the CRAN packages (i.e. installing xml2, not r-cran-xml2) eases use. Doing it from via the standard R command install.packages() (or wrapper around it like our install.r from littler package) is very good too and an excellent technical achievement.

There is, as best as I can tell, only one shortcoming, along with one small bit of false advertising. The shortcoming is technical. By bringing the package installation into the user application domain, it is separated from the system and lacks integration with system libraries. What do I mean here? If you were to add R to a plain Ubuntu container, say 18.04 or 20.04, then added the few lines to support RSPM and install xml2 it would install. And fail. Why? Because the system library libxml2 does not get installed with the RSPM package—whereas the .deb from the distribution or PPAs does. So to help with some popular packages I added libxml2, libunits and a few more for geospatial work to the rocker/r-rspm containers. Being already present ensures packages xml2 and units can run immediately. Please file issue tickets at the Rocker repo if you come across other missing libraries we could preload. (A related minor nag is incomplete coverage. At least one of my CRAN packages does not (yet?) come as a RSPM binary. Then again, CRAN has 16k packages, and the RSPM coverage is much wider than the PPA one. But completeness would be neat. The final nag is lack of Debian support which seems, well, odd.)

So what about the small bit of false advertising? Well it is claimed that RSPM makes installation “so much faster on Linux”. True, faster than the slowest possible installation from source. Also easier. But we had numerous posts on this blog showing other speed gains: Using ccache. And, of course, using binaries. And as the initial video mentioned above showed, installing from the PPAs is also faster than via RSPM. That is easy to replicate. Just set up the rocker/r-ubuntu:20.04 (or 18.04) container alongside the rocker/r-rspm:20.04 (or also 18.04) container. And then time install.r rstan (or install.r tinyverse) in the RSPM one against apt -y update; apt install -y r-cran-rstan (or ... r-cran-tinyverse). In every case I tried, the installation using binaries from the PPA was still faster by a few seconds. Not that it matters greatly: both are very, very quick compared to source installation (as e.g. shown here in 2017 (!!)) but the standard Ubuntu .deb installation is simply faster than using RSPM. (Likely due to better CDN usage so this may change over time. Neither method appears to do downloads in parallel so there is scope for both for doing better.)

So in sum: Welcome to RSPM, and nice new tool—and feel free to “drive” it using rocker/r-rspm:18.04 or rocker/r-rspm:20.04.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub. For the first year, GitHub will match your contributions.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 150 released

3 July, 2020 - 07:00

The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 150. This version includes the following changes:

[ Chris Lamb ]
* Don't crash when listing entries in archives if they don't have a listed
  size (such as hardlinks in .ISO files).
  (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#188)
* Dump PE32+ executables (including EFI applications) using objdump.
  (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#181)
* Tidy detection of JSON files due to missing call to File.recognizes that
  checks against the output of file(1) which was also causing us to attempt
  to parse almost every file using json.loads. (Whoops.)
* Drop accidentally-duplicated copy of the new --diff-mask tests.
* Logging improvements:
  - Split out formatting of class names into a common method.
  - Clarify that we are generating presenter formats in the opening logs.

[ Jean-Romain Garnier ]
* Remove objdjump(1) offsets before instructions to reduce diff noise.
  (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope!57)

You find out more by visiting the project homepage.

Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, June 2020

3 July, 2020 - 02:25

I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative, and worked all 20 hours this month.

I sent a final request for testing for the next update to Linux 3.16 in jessie. I also prepared an update to Linux 4.9, included in both jessie and stretch. I completed backporting of kernel changes related to CVE-2020-0543, which was still under embargo, to Linux 3.16.

Finally I uploaded the updates for Linux 3.16 and 4.9, and issued DLA-2241 and DLA-2242.

The end of June marked the end of long-term support for Debian 8 "jessie" and for Linux 3.16. I am no longer maintaining any stable kernel branches, but will continue contributing to them as part of my work on Debian 9 "stretch" LTS and other Debian releases.

Pages

Creative Commons License ลิขสิทธิ์ของบทความเป็นของเจ้าของบทความแต่ละชิ้น
ผลงานนี้ ใช้สัญญาอนุญาตของครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์แบบ แสดงที่มา-อนุญาตแบบเดียวกัน 3.0 ที่ยังไม่ได้ปรับแก้